Cans and Eggs

Canned foods are very versatile and have very long shelf lives.

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TIN1

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But what is in our can?

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TIN5

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We decided to can our Squid, Seaweed and Mackerel Salad. 😎

Don´t worry, I was only joking! :biggrin:

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TIN2

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These cans are actually used as a presentation device. (Who says that there is no humour in the kitchens…? :cheerful: )

The fish is briefly marinated in salt then vinegar for about 30 minutes, any longer then the texture and taste changes.

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The squid is sliced than blanched before being given an ice bath.The salad is then dressed in a mixture of rice vinegar, mirin, soy sauce, ginger, garlic and sesame oil.

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TIN3

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TIN4

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Before serving the salad is topped with roasted sesame seeds and chopped chives.

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Eggs. They are everywhere, and they are not only used for breakfast…

Many restaurants are taking the humble egg and adding it to their dinner menus, and not as omelettes or tortillas, eggs are now appearing as the stars of their own dishes.

Seeing as everyone is doing it, we decided to finally join in (well, not really “finally” as we used this egg in our Laotian Salad with Egg Dressing two years ago, but then the egg played second fiddle to dressing).

It is a well known fact that “the perfect egg” can be achieved by cooking it for 45 minutes or more at 63ºc.  I am not going to go into the details of this procedure as there are many sites online dedicated to the subject, but to cut a long story short, eggs whites begin to thicken at 63ºc whilst the yolk will start at 65ºc.

Our resulting egg therefore has a jelly or custard like white and a nice and runny yolk.

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EGG1

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Such and egg is perfect for a soup, and in our case, a warm (not hot, we don´t want to undo all that effort) Seaweed Soup.

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EGG2

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The warm broth is added to the plates just before serving.

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EGG3.

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EGG4

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We also serve the egg with our “Suki Soup” which has vermicelli noodles and our homemade sauce.

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Our Steamed Buns are now being made with a sprinkling of Poppy Seeds.

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Chicken Burger 1

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Seeing as these buns are no longer stuffed, we use them for such treats as our Chicken Cake Burgers.

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Chicken Burger 2

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These burgers are snapped up when we make them for our Tapas Time which is served at 16.00hrs. People seem to love the sticky sweet chill sauce that we add. However, the ones for the cooks are always slathered in Sriracha Sauce! :biggrin:

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A lot of ducks pass though our kitchens. One of the standard dishes on our menu is Duck Breast Roasted on the Bone.

The crown of duck (basically the whole duck with the legs removed) is marinated for three days before being roasted. When cooked, the breast meat is removed from the carcass and served with a sauce made from the duck bones. Cooking the breast on the bone allows us to achieve a juicier finished dish.

The innards are used for other dishes.

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DUCK1

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DUCK2

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Once in a while we serve up such dishes as “Specials” when we have enough livers, hearts and gizzards…

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DUCK3

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Spicy Duck with Basil.

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The legs of the duck are used for other dishes which are slow cooked due to the nature of them being slightly tough (the ducks paddle around a lot, so its normal for the leg meat to be tougher). Nothing goes to waste in the kitchen. Especially a Lao one…….. 😆

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6 thoughts on “Cans and Eggs

  1. Hello! Great practics, insights and advices. The question is: where you get empty cans from? Or in other words, what was canned content? I am really curious to find out what canned stuff you are using.

  2. Hi Sauliius and Seeharhed,
    Saulius, we buy the empty cans from Catering and Gastronomy shops here in Spain, they are used to serve the dishes or tapas, nothing we used is actually from a can. They also sell round tins and empty caviar tins as well as empty jars, which we also use on occasion.
    Seeharhed, yep, nothing goes to waste in a Lao kitchen, thats one of its best virtues. One of our favourites is beef tripe stew, which our loacl butcher sometimes supplies us with…yummy…
     
     

  3. I love how the eggs look. You said that you didn’t want to go into details of how you cooked the eggs, but I still want to know how you cooked them and what you use to make them into that shape. Thanks

  4. Hola Boui,
    The (room temperature) eggs are placed in luke warm water then placed in our steam oven for an hour and 15 minutes at 63ºc. When needed they are cracked like regular eggs in to warm water, then carefully spooned on to kitchen paper and rolled around until we have the desired shape.
    Hope that helps… :biggrin:
     

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